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Valley Forge National Historic Park was the encampment site of George Washington and the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.
Valley Forge National Historic Park was the encampment site of George Washington and the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.
Flickr user Nestor Lacle

14 American Revolution sites to see in Philadelphia

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Valley Forge National Historic Park was the encampment site of George Washington and the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.
| Flickr user Nestor Lacle

For folks who are sticking around Philly for July 4, we can assure you that you won't be without things to do and sites to see. Your nights are already booked with firework shows, but there are plenty of events going on during the day, too. Here, we've compiled 14 important sites from the American Revolution, from the only standing fort in Philly to the many historic homes that hosted our founding fathers like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. Happy Fourth!

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1. Fort Mifflin

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4600 Hog Island Road
Philadelphia, PA 19153
This site, right by the airport, is where the 400 men at Fort Mifflin held the British navy at bay for weeks, allowing George Washington and his troops to travel safely to Valley Forge. Today, it's the only fort in Philadelphia and one of the only remaining intact battlefields of the American Revolutionary War. It will host a July 2 celebration complete with picnics, reenactments, and cannon blasts.
Wikimedia Commons

2. Tomb Of The Unknown Soldier

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209 West Washington Square
Philadelphia, PA 19107
The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is in Washington Square, which served as a burial ground for fallen soldiers during the American Revolutionary War. In the 1950s, a committee decided to dedicate the park to George Washington and an unknown soldier. An archeological dig discovered an unnamed male who was about 20 years old at the time of his burial.
Wikimedia Commons

3. Declaration House

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701 Market St
Philadelphia, PA 19106
You know where the Declaration of Independence was signed, but here's where it was actually written. Thomas Jefferson rented the second floor of this home and spent the summer drafting together the iconic document. This house, also called the Graff House, was originally built in 1775 and rebuilt in 1975.
Wikimedia Commons

4. Cliveden

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6401 Germantown Ave
Philadelphia, PA 19144
Cliveden, or the Benjamin Chew House, was the site of one of the bloodiest battles of Germantown in 1777. Today the beautiful Georgian-style house sits on six acres and offers tours.

It will host an Independence Day celebration on July 4 from 12 to 4 p.m.
Wikimedia Commons

5. Valley Forge National Historical Park

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1400 N Outer Line Dr
King of Prussia, PA 19406
(610) 783-1000
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George Washington and his Continental Army camped out here from 1777 to 1778 braving the winter cold. Much of the original structures remain, though there are some are recreations.

On July 4 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. the park will host Picnic in the Park, a day-long celebration including reenactments, food, and kid-friendly activities.
Wikimedia Commons

6. Christ Church Burial Ground

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400 Arch St
Philadelphia, PA 19106
(215) 922-1695
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Here's where some of our country's founding fathers and American Revolutionary heroes now lie, in a 1,400-plot cemetery by Christ Church. You'll find Benjamin Franklin's tomb, and walk along the same streets as Betsy Ross and Revolution-era folks did.
Wikimedia Commons

7. John Wister "Grumblethorpe" House

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5267 Germantown Ave
Philadelphia, PA 19144
Built way back in 1744, this was the home of John Wister, a Philadelphia merchant and wine importer. But during the Battle of Germantown, it was occupied by the British army's General James Agnew, who was ultimately shot and killed at this very site. His blood stains remain.
Wikimedia Commons

8. Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial

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301 Pine St
Philadelphia, PA 19106
(215) 965-2305
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Stop by the smallest national park in the country, the Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial at 3rd and Pine. It was the home of a Polish revolutionary war fighter who moved to Philadelphia and was BFFs with Thomas Jefferson.
Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

9. Common Sense Historical Marker

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Thomas Paine Pl
Philadelphia, PA 19106
While the print shop no longer exists, there's a historical marker here that marks the site where the Thomas Paine's infamous Common Sense pamphlet was printed. Common Sense was written in 1774-75 and advocated for the colonies' independence from Great Britain.

10. Independence Hall

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520 Chestnut St
Philadelphia, PA 19106
(215) 965-2305
Visit Website
A visit to this spot during July 4 goes without saying. It's the site of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution signing, and it's going to host a long list of events throughout the weekend, from a Historic Block Party to a Philly Pops' concert to the Independence Day parade.
Courtesy of Shutterstock

11. Powel House

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244 S 3rd St
Philadelphia, PA 19106
(215) 627-0364
Visit Website
This gorgeous Georgian property was the home of Samuel Powel, the last Philly mayor under British rule and the first after Independence. He and his wife Elizabeth were considered a power couple during the Revolution era and were close friends of George and Martha Washington. During the war, British soldiers occupied the home.

It will offer $1 admission on July 1 (with pretzels!).
Wikimedia Commons

12. Bonus: Museum of the American Revolution

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101 S 3rd St
Philadelphia, PA 19106
No, this brand-new museum doesn't date back to the American Revolution, but the thousands of artifacts housed here do. The Robert A.M. Stern-designed museum in Old City is hosting a weekend-long celebration for Independence Day, from July 1 to July 4. Everyday there will be a Declaration of Independence signing, a birthday celebration with cake on July 2 at 1 p.m., and a concert on the plaza by the Old Barracks Fife and Drum Corps on July 3.

13. Brandywine Battlefield Park

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Baltimore Pike
Chadds Ford, PA 19137
(610) 459-3342
Visit Website
When it comes to the war of the American Revolution, most folks learn about the April 19 shot heard around the world at Lexington, or George Washington and his crew crossing the Delaware River. But the Battle of Brandywine was, in fact, that largest fought in terms of combatants on September 11, 1777. It's open on the Fourth of July.

A post shared by Paul Grossman (@pauljgrossman) on

14. Paoli Battlefield

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Monument Avenue
Malvern, PA 19355
This well-preserved 44-acre site in Malvern served as the grounds for the Battle of Paoli, also known as the Paoli Massacre. The American Revolutionary battle took place just weeks after the Battle of the Brandywine, which took place on September 20-21, 1777. Here, you'll find the second oldest war memorial in the U.S. and the oldest in Pennsylvania.

1. Fort Mifflin

4600 Hog Island Road, Philadelphia, PA 19153
Wikimedia Commons
This site, right by the airport, is where the 400 men at Fort Mifflin held the British navy at bay for weeks, allowing George Washington and his troops to travel safely to Valley Forge. Today, it's the only fort in Philadelphia and one of the only remaining intact battlefields of the American Revolutionary War. It will host a July 2 celebration complete with picnics, reenactments, and cannon blasts.
4600 Hog Island Road
Philadelphia, PA 19153

2. Tomb Of The Unknown Soldier

209 West Washington Square, Philadelphia, PA 19107
Wikimedia Commons
The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is in Washington Square, which served as a burial ground for fallen soldiers during the American Revolutionary War. In the 1950s, a committee decided to dedicate the park to George Washington and an unknown soldier. An archeological dig discovered an unnamed male who was about 20 years old at the time of his burial.
209 West Washington Square
Philadelphia, PA 19107

3. Declaration House

701 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19106
Wikimedia Commons
You know where the Declaration of Independence was signed, but here's where it was actually written. Thomas Jefferson rented the second floor of this home and spent the summer drafting together the iconic document. This house, also called the Graff House, was originally built in 1775 and rebuilt in 1975.
701 Market St
Philadelphia, PA 19106

4. Cliveden

6401 Germantown Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19144
Wikimedia Commons
Cliveden, or the Benjamin Chew House, was the site of one of the bloodiest battles of Germantown in 1777. Today the beautiful Georgian-style house sits on six acres and offers tours.

It will host an Independence Day celebration on July 4 from 12 to 4 p.m.
6401 Germantown Ave
Philadelphia, PA 19144

5. Valley Forge National Historical Park

1400 N Outer Line Dr, King of Prussia, PA 19406
Wikimedia Commons
George Washington and his Continental Army camped out here from 1777 to 1778 braving the winter cold. Much of the original structures remain, though there are some are recreations.

On July 4 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. the park will host Picnic in the Park, a day-long celebration including reenactments, food, and kid-friendly activities.
1400 N Outer Line Dr
King of Prussia, PA 19406

6. Christ Church Burial Ground

400 Arch St, Philadelphia, PA 19106
Wikimedia Commons
Here's where some of our country's founding fathers and American Revolutionary heroes now lie, in a 1,400-plot cemetery by Christ Church. You'll find Benjamin Franklin's tomb, and walk along the same streets as Betsy Ross and Revolution-era folks did.
400 Arch St
Philadelphia, PA 19106

7. John Wister "Grumblethorpe" House

5267 Germantown Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19144
Wikimedia Commons
Built way back in 1744, this was the home of John Wister, a Philadelphia merchant and wine importer. But during the Battle of Germantown, it was occupied by the British army's General James Agnew, who was ultimately shot and killed at this very site. His blood stains remain.
5267 Germantown Ave
Philadelphia, PA 19144

8. Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial

301 Pine St, Philadelphia, PA 19106
Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Stop by the smallest national park in the country, the Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial at 3rd and Pine. It was the home of a Polish revolutionary war fighter who moved to Philadelphia and was BFFs with Thomas Jefferson.
301 Pine St
Philadelphia, PA 19106

9. Common Sense Historical Marker

Thomas Paine Pl, Philadelphia, PA 19106
While the print shop no longer exists, there's a historical marker here that marks the site where the Thomas Paine's infamous Common Sense pamphlet was printed. Common Sense was written in 1774-75 and advocated for the colonies' independence from Great Britain.
Thomas Paine Pl
Philadelphia, PA 19106

10. Independence Hall

520 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106
Courtesy of Shutterstock
A visit to this spot during July 4 goes without saying. It's the site of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution signing, and it's going to host a long list of events throughout the weekend, from a Historic Block Party to a Philly Pops' concert to the Independence Day parade.
520 Chestnut St
Philadelphia, PA 19106

11. Powel House

244 S 3rd St, Philadelphia, PA 19106
Wikimedia Commons
This gorgeous Georgian property was the home of Samuel Powel, the last Philly mayor under British rule and the first after Independence. He and his wife Elizabeth were considered a power couple during the Revolution era and were close friends of George and Martha Washington. During the war, British soldiers occupied the home.

It will offer $1 admission on July 1 (with pretzels!).
244 S 3rd St
Philadelphia, PA 19106

12. Bonus: Museum of the American Revolution

101 S 3rd St, Philadelphia, PA 19106
No, this brand-new museum doesn't date back to the American Revolution, but the thousands of artifacts housed here do. The Robert A.M. Stern-designed museum in Old City is hosting a weekend-long celebration for Independence Day, from July 1 to July 4. Everyday there will be a Declaration of Independence signing, a birthday celebration with cake on July 2 at 1 p.m., and a concert on the plaza by the Old Barracks Fife and Drum Corps on July 3.
101 S 3rd St
Philadelphia, PA 19106

13. Brandywine Battlefield Park

Baltimore Pike, Chadds Ford, PA 19137
When it comes to the war of the American Revolution, most folks learn about the April 19 shot heard around the world at Lexington, or George Washington and his crew crossing the Delaware River. But the Battle of Brandywine was, in fact, that largest fought in terms of combatants on September 11, 1777. It's open on the Fourth of July.

A post shared by Paul Grossman (@pauljgrossman) on

Baltimore Pike
Chadds Ford, PA 19137

14. Paoli Battlefield

Monument Avenue, Malvern, PA 19355
This well-preserved 44-acre site in Malvern served as the grounds for the Battle of Paoli, also known as the Paoli Massacre. The American Revolutionary battle took place just weeks after the Battle of the Brandywine, which took place on September 20-21, 1777. Here, you'll find the second oldest war memorial in the U.S. and the oldest in Pennsylvania.
Monument Avenue
Malvern, PA 19355