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The Ever-Expanding Map of Demolished Frank Furness

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A little while ago, we showed you a map of how different Center City Philadelphia might have looked had so many of Frank Furness' uniquely beautiful works not been demolished - many of them shockingly soon after they were completed. Since then, we've learned heartening news of several Furness churches that have been saved from demolition, but several of you, in response to our request to help expand our map, have emailed to inform us of additional Furness treasures that are sadly long past saving. Here's the updated map, whose most recent entry, the John G. Johnson House on South Broad, once housed the core of early European works that now reside at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

· The Frank Furness you'll never see in Center City [Curbed Philly]
· One less Furness Lost: Church of Atonement [Curbed Philly]
· How a Furness church was saved (19th Street Baptist Church) [Curbed Philly]

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1. Church of the Redeemer

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100 Queen Street
Philadelphia, PA 19147

Full name: Church of the Redeemer for Seamen and their Families."Designed in 1878, the new brownstone edifice contained a reading room that provided bibles and other religious reading for sailors and their shipmates. It also included a parish house, known as the “Brewer School House” in honor of its donor, Charles Brewer of Pittsburgh. The building was subsequently used as a club house for boys. And in the 1960s, it was used as the meeting place for the Queen Village Neighbors Association. The ornate Victorian structure burned down in 1974."

2. Rodef Shalom Synagogue

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North Broad Street & Mount Vernon Street
Philadelphia, PA 19130

Completed in 1868, this was the congregation's first building, constructed in the Moorish Revival style.

3. The McKean Townhouses

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1923 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103

Built in 1869, Demolished in the 1920's.

4. Provident Life and Trust Company

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42 South 4th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106

1876 - 1960: Considered to have been one of the architect's greatest works, in which he "experimented with architectural features that would become part of his distinctive design vocabulary: unorthodox stone massing; revealing (and even highlighting) structure; compressed, piston-like columns; polychromy, all in a Moorish-influenced Modern Gothic style."

5. Chestnut Street Station

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2400 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103

1888 - 1963: "Built as the main passenger station for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The station was essentially built on stilts, with the main entrance from the Chestnut Street Bridge, 30 feet above ground level...Through the station's innovative plan, he separated the flow of passengers waiting to board the trains from those arriving."

6. Franklin Building

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125 South 12th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107

"The Franklin Building was designed by Frank Furness in 1895 for William West Frazier of the Franklin Sugar Company. Frazier was a childhood friend and major patron of Furness throughout his career having him design houses, clubs, and offices over the years. The Franklin Building was demolished in 1940. The property at 125 S. 12th Street has been a parking lot in the 70+ years since it was knocked down."

7. Alexander J. Cassatt Townhouse

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202 West Rittenhouse Square
Philadelphia, PA 19103

Built for the then-president of the Pennsylvania Railroad, demolished just after 1971.

8. Broad Street Station

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1400 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107

When it opened in 1893, this was the world's largest passenger railroad terminal. It was demolished in 1953. The adjacent Arcade Building and Pedestrian Bridge, completed in 1902, was demolished in 1969.

9. The Arcade Building

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1500 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102

The building adjacent to Broad Street Station, completed in 1902, was demolished in 1969. "The Pennsylvania Railroad hired Furness, Evans & Company to design the Arcade Building, an office building of the same red brick, stone and terra cotta as the station, that connected to it through a pedestrian bridge over Market Street. This relieved much of the pedestrian traffic at street level, and the City permitted the Arcade Building to be built over the 15th Street sidewalk."

10. Guarantee Trust & Safe Deposit Co.

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300 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106

"Part of Chestnut Street’s “Bank Row,” the Guarantee Trust and Deposit Company was constructed between 1873 and 1875. The bank’s design was closely related to Furness and Hewitt’s Academy of the Fine Arts, featuring a central entrance block bordered on either side by a mansarded pavilion. The building’s brick and marble façade referred to the Venetian Gothic, and the rational segmented plan reflected Beaux Arts logic."

11. Lutheran Church of Holy Communion

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1400 Arch Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107

Built 1870-75 by Fraser, Furness, and Hewitt. Demolished Early 20th Century."The entire building cost, including the lot, about $200,000. The church was among the firm's most polychromatic works, and design of the church was praised at the American Institute of Architects conference at the 1876 Centennial."

12. Francis Thomas Sully Darley Residence

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510 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19146

John G. Johnson Home left his art collection to the City of Philadelphia with the provision that it be exhibited at 510 South Broad Street, but when the fire marshal found the residence not to be fireproof, in June 1933 the 275 works were "temporarily" transferred to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The City demolished the Broad Street house to build a medical clinic in the late-1950s.

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1. Church of the Redeemer

100 Queen Street, Philadelphia, PA 19147

Full name: Church of the Redeemer for Seamen and their Families."Designed in 1878, the new brownstone edifice contained a reading room that provided bibles and other religious reading for sailors and their shipmates. It also included a parish house, known as the “Brewer School House” in honor of its donor, Charles Brewer of Pittsburgh. The building was subsequently used as a club house for boys. And in the 1960s, it was used as the meeting place for the Queen Village Neighbors Association. The ornate Victorian structure burned down in 1974."

100 Queen Street
Philadelphia, PA 19147

2. Rodef Shalom Synagogue

North Broad Street & Mount Vernon Street, Philadelphia, PA 19130

Completed in 1868, this was the congregation's first building, constructed in the Moorish Revival style.

North Broad Street & Mount Vernon Street
Philadelphia, PA 19130

3. The McKean Townhouses

1923 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103

Built in 1869, Demolished in the 1920's.

1923 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103

4. Provident Life and Trust Company

42 South 4th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106

1876 - 1960: Considered to have been one of the architect's greatest works, in which he "experimented with architectural features that would become part of his distinctive design vocabulary: unorthodox stone massing; revealing (and even highlighting) structure; compressed, piston-like columns; polychromy, all in a Moorish-influenced Modern Gothic style."

42 South 4th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106

5. Chestnut Street Station

2400 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103

1888 - 1963: "Built as the main passenger station for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The station was essentially built on stilts, with the main entrance from the Chestnut Street Bridge, 30 feet above ground level...Through the station's innovative plan, he separated the flow of passengers waiting to board the trains from those arriving."

2400 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103

6. Franklin Building

125 South 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107

"The Franklin Building was designed by Frank Furness in 1895 for William West Frazier of the Franklin Sugar Company. Frazier was a childhood friend and major patron of Furness throughout his career having him design houses, clubs, and offices over the years. The Franklin Building was demolished in 1940. The property at 125 S. 12th Street has been a parking lot in the 70+ years since it was knocked down."

125 South 12th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107

7. Alexander J. Cassatt Townhouse

202 West Rittenhouse Square, Philadelphia, PA 19103

Built for the then-president of the Pennsylvania Railroad, demolished just after 1971.

202 West Rittenhouse Square
Philadelphia, PA 19103

8. Broad Street Station

1400 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107

When it opened in 1893, this was the world's largest passenger railroad terminal. It was demolished in 1953. The adjacent Arcade Building and Pedestrian Bridge, completed in 1902, was demolished in 1969.

1400 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107

9. The Arcade Building

1500 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102

The building adjacent to Broad Street Station, completed in 1902, was demolished in 1969. "The Pennsylvania Railroad hired Furness, Evans & Company to design the Arcade Building, an office building of the same red brick, stone and terra cotta as the station, that connected to it through a pedestrian bridge over Market Street. This relieved much of the pedestrian traffic at street level, and the City permitted the Arcade Building to be built over the 15th Street sidewalk."

1500 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102

10. Guarantee Trust & Safe Deposit Co.

300 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106

"Part of Chestnut Street’s “Bank Row,” the Guarantee Trust and Deposit Company was constructed between 1873 and 1875. The bank’s design was closely related to Furness and Hewitt’s Academy of the Fine Arts, featuring a central entrance block bordered on either side by a mansarded pavilion. The building’s brick and marble façade referred to the Venetian Gothic, and the rational segmented plan reflected Beaux Arts logic."

300 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106

11. Lutheran Church of Holy Communion

1400 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107

Built 1870-75 by Fraser, Furness, and Hewitt. Demolished Early 20th Century."The entire building cost, including the lot, about $200,000. The church was among the firm's most polychromatic works, and design of the church was praised at the American Institute of Architects conference at the 1876 Centennial."

1400 Arch Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107

12. Francis Thomas Sully Darley Residence

510 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19146

John G. Johnson Home left his art collection to the City of Philadelphia with the provision that it be exhibited at 510 South Broad Street, but when the fire marshal found the residence not to be fireproof, in June 1933 the 275 works were "temporarily" transferred to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The City demolished the Broad Street house to build a medical clinic in the late-1950s.

510 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19146